World's First Solar Yacht Debuts

Posted by March 22, 2018

Maritime Propulsion

  • Silent 64 (Photo: Silent Yachts)
  • Silent 75 (Photo: Silent Yachts)
  • Silent 64 (Photo: Silent Yachts)

  • Silent 75 (Photo: Silent Yachts)

Silent Yachts announced that this week at the Palm Beach International Boat Show it will showcase the world's first solar yacht
 
With energy conservation and emission reduction mandates sweeping through traditional commercial maritime sectors, Silent Yachts is seeking to get a leg up in the luxury sector with the world's first and only oceangoing production yachts in the world that are fully solar sustainable and exclusively powered by solar energy.
 
After 5 years of testing, Silent Yachts was officially launched in 2009 and this year it showcases its vessel featuring solar power engines, which reportedly has performed well during the day and during the night, in all weather conditions. 


All Silent Yacht are hand built in Turkey or China at world known shipyards.

 
The Silent 64 is splashing into the U.S. in March 2018, a vessel that is customizable up to 4 staterooms, with plentiful under deck storage for water toys. 
 
Specifications Silent 64
Length, o.a.: 19,43 m (64‘)
Beam, o.a.: 9,5 m (31,2‘)
Draft: 1,1 m (3,6‘)
Light displ. (EC): 25 tons
Water: 500 – 1.000
Waste-Water: 2 x 500
Fuel: 500 – 1.600
Solar Generator: 9,000 Wp
E-Motors: 2 X 30KW / 2 x 135kW
Generator: 22 kW / 100 kW
Cruising Speed: 6 – 8 kt / 12 – 15 kt
Top Speed: approx. 12 kt / 20 kt

 
The Silent75 is the 75 ft. version, the only one in the Silent Yachts fleet that boasts a garage accommodating up to a 15 ft. tender, paddle boards, and dive bottles.
 
 
Specifications for Silent 75
Length, o.a.: 22.80 m (74.8‘)
Beam, o.a.: 10.67 m (35.0‘)
Draft: 1.20 m (3.9‘)
Light displ. (EC): 42 tons
Water: 1.000 – 2.000
Waste-Water: 2 x 500
Fuel: 1.000 – 3.000
Solar Generator: 20,000 Wp
E-Motors: 2 x 135 kW / 2 x 400 kW
Generator: 100 kW / 2 x 100 kW
Cruising Speed:  6 – 8 kt / 12 – 15 kt
Top Speed:  approx. 12 kt / 20 kt
 
 
solar energyTurkeyUnited States